Dams are at all-time lows; municipal water costs are rising and people are getting angry. There has never been a better time to examine alternative water sources than right now. Drilling a borehole and becoming self-sustainable might be an option worth considering.

Here's what you need to know about the process of drilling boreholes:

#1 Borehole siting

Determining where the water is and how to reach it, is the first step when it comes to drilling boreholes. It is crucial to employ professionals for this task to avoid drilling into natural hazards or pipelines and cables.

#2 Drilling and Construction

The next step is to commence with the drilling. Special machinery is used to drill deep into the earth's surface. While the depth of an average borehole ranges between 60m - 80m, it can vary greatly from one borehole to another. Construction comes next in the form of steel casing to reinforce the borehole.

#3 Yield testing

Yield testing is done to determine the balance between the greatest amount of water that can be yielded from the borehole and the amount of water that flows back from the neighbouring groundwater source. In order to do yield testing, an aquifer test is carried out. A test pump is installed and water is pumped for a fixed time and set of variables to access the water level in the borehole.

#4 Pump and filter installation

Once the yield testing is done, you'll be advised on the pump you need. The type of pump system will depend largely on your intended use of your new borehole. If your domestic borehole will be used for drinking water, you'll need a filtration system to get rid of contaminants from your water supply.

If you are interested in drilling a borehole on your property, get in touch with one of the experts at Enviro Boreholes. With over 10-year experience in the industry, you can be sure to receive professional and advice and great service.

  • Purpose of borehole - will the water be used for irrigation, domestic usage or to fill up a reserve tank.
  • Flow rate - which means the amount of water to be moved and the pressure needed to get it there
  • Distance the water needs to travel - from under the ground to the top of the borehole, and from the borehole to your tap
  • Refill rate - the water level in your borehole will drop when pumping water and will refill when it rains
Published in Blog

Every living thing needs water. There's no way we'll be able to survive without water, and while some of the provinces in South Africa has more water than others, there has never been a better time to become more self-sufficient and install a borehole on your property.
But before you do, there are some things you should know about drilling boreholes.

What can I use borehole water for?

Borehole water can be used for irrigation and domestic use. If you've tested your water and decide to make use of a filter, water can also be used to drink and cook with.

Do I have to register my borehole?

If you'll only be using your water source for domestic purposes, there's no need to register it. In case of use for commercial and agricultural purposes, you would have to register your borehole.

How much does a borehole installation cost?

There are many things to consider with regards to the cost of drilling a borehole such as the depth, filtration and pump and the amount of casing used but a rough estimate would be anything from R60 000 to R90 000.

Where will they install my borehole?

It all depends on the size of your property. And in most cases properties in South Africa are enclosed with walls, making it difficult to even get a rig onto the property. A thorough inspection is done by Enviro Boreholes before quotation stage to provide you with all the information.

What's the lifespan of a borehole?

If you do regular maintenance, you can expect to get 20-30 years out of the major components of your borehole.

Is drilling a borehole a good investment?

While there are costs involved in drilling a borehole, once you're up and running you'll have a secure water source and won't have to tap into municipal water ever again. The average borehole can yield up to 20 000 litres of water per day.

If you need additional information from the experts, why not get in contact with one of the team members at Enviro Boreholes. They have more than ten years experience in drilling boreholes and know everything there is to know about the process. Give them a call today.

Published in Blog

Roelf Burger - Managing Director


Cell: 079 490 2314 | 072 792 8026
Email: info@enviroboreholes.co.za

Physical Address
Plot 11, Randfontein–South, Randfontein, Gauteng, 1759


Postal Address
P.O Box 2633, Kocksvlei, Randfontein, 1760

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